Calendar

9896
Jan
21
Mon
THE PEOPLES MARCH – the Fifth Annual March to Reclaim King’s Radical Legacy
Jan 21 all-day

THE PEOPLES MARCH – the Fifth Annual March to Reclaim King’s Radical Legacy….A mass mobilization.

The Peoples March – Reclaim King’s Radical Legacy

We will hold Oscar Grant Plaza from sunrise to sunset. The schedule is still evolving, and includes an entire day of events, remembrance, building, and organizing.  There will be hourly rituals, including the sounding of a gong and lighting or torches to call our attention to the ways our community is harmed by violence. The tentative schedule is below:

7:20 am – 7:45 am – Sunrise Ceremony and Launch of Tiny Home Building Project
8:00 am – 9:00 am  – Morning meditation and Sound Healing. Families with children are invited to participate. Free breakfast will be served until the March steps off.
9:00 am – 10:30 am – Kids teach-in and Family March around the plaza
10:30 am – 11:00 am – Storytelling, Sound Healing and Rituals for kids and families
11:00 am – 1:30 pm – Program & March!
1:30 pm – 2:30 pm – March ends with Celebration
2:30 pm – 4:30 pm – People’s Assemblies & Lunch:

  • Housing/Homelessness
  • Development/Displacement
  • Inner Communal Violence
  • Public Safety/Use of Force Campaign
  • Oakland Schools/Teachers Strike
  • Sanctuary
  • Mini First Responder Training

4:30pm-5pm – As the last torch is lit, we will chant Oscar Grant’s name as well as the names of all of the other victims of police brutality over the last ten years. When you hear the gong, we will move into the Sunset Ceremony
5:00 pm – 8:00 pm – Sunset and Lead to Life Ceremony

You can keep up to date in real time on APTP’s Facebook event page,

 

For the 5th year running, the Anti Police-Terror Project calls the Bay Area into the streets for the People’s March to Reclaim MLK’s Radical Legacy.

January 2019 marks the 10th anniversary of the murder of Oscar Grant. This year, we honor the mothers of those lost to police violence, and

Our Facebook event page will have the full schedule, as it’s developed. Please join, share and follow it: https://www.facebook.com/events/306880009918687/

It’s also been another 10 years of gentrification. Another 10 years of displacement. Another 10 years of a worsening houselessness crisis. Another 10 years of the Bay Area’s elected leaders putting profits over people. Another 10 years of government for and by developers, tech companies, and banks — instead of for and by the People.

The People have had enough. On Jan. 21, we march for justice for all victims of police terror and their families. We march for housing as a human right. We march for a just economy that meets everyone’s human needs. We march for real community safety, which means defunding the police to invest in our communities. We march for quality education for all our kids. We march for real sanctuary in the Bay. We march for a sustainable climate and healthy environment for all families.

We demand a Bay Area for All of Us. We demand a Bay Area for the People.

Demands:
– Justice for ALL victims of police terror and their families
Housing as a human right
– A just economy that works for everyone, putting people over profits; living wage jobs with dignity for all and community benefits
– Community-based public safety: Defund the police
– Quality education for all: No cuts, no closures
– Real sanctuary for all: Abolish ICE
– Environmental justice and healthy communities
– Indigenous sovereignty and respect for sacred sites

#ThePeoplesMarch
#10hours4OscarGrant
#ReclaimMLKintheBay
#HousingisaHumanRight

65429
Jan
22
Tue
Hands Off Our Park: Defend People’s Park From Cops And Chainsaws @ People's Park
Jan 22 @ 11:30 am – 1:30 pm

Last week, over 150 heavily armed police officers came with guns and chainsaws to cut down our trees and trash our homes. Six people – community members and students – were violently awoken and handcuffed at 5 am, on charges of “illegal camping” – because they had put up tents and tarps as shelter from the rain. All of their belongings were seized or trashed.

We reject the UC’s claim that this is about sick trees. This is about razing one of Berkeley’s few public spaces to turn it into privatized, luxury dorms. Some trees were supposedly removed because they were “too close to other trees”. Others were completely removed over health issues that are normally solved by removing a branch. The only thing “wrong” with those trees was that they stood in the way of the construction equipment the UC intends to bring in.

They came in the dark of night, during break, when they knew most students would be away from Berkeley, to make it look like students didn’t care. Join us in the park at 11:30 for a rally, and then march to campus, to show the UC that the park belongs to the People, not militarized cops and not private corporations!

65528
Jan
23
Wed
Ending Urban Shield “As It Is Currently Constituted” – Final Task Force Meeting @ Alameda County Administration Bldg
Jan 23 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am

Thursday’s 1/10/19 meeting was not the final task force meeting after all. They will meet again on Monday January 14 from 3 to 8pm and then again on January 22 from 9-11am.

As of 1/14, the Task Force completed its votes on recommendations. This meeting on the 23rd will be pro forma to put the recommendations into final form to forward to the Alameda County Board of Supervisors.

=====

Meeting of the Alameda County Board of Supervisors’ Ad Hoc Committee on Urban Area Security Initiative, charged with reconstituting and rethinking Urban Shield.

The committee was established by the Board of Supervisors in March 2018 in response to sustained community concerns about Urban Shield, which is funded in part by UASI grants from the Department of Homeland Security, and coordinated by the Alameda County Sheriff’s Office.

The Board of Supervisors decided in March, 2018 that 2018 would be the last year the county would approve Urban Shield, as currently constituted, and asked the Ad Hoc Committee to make recommendations to the Board on the UASI-funded emergency preparedness training and exercise in 2019 and beyond.

More information.

Agendas and materials for each meeting are posted at http://www.acgov.org/board/calendarcom.htm

65495
Leadership Training for Tenant and Community Organizing @ South Berkeley Senior Center
Jan 23 @ 1:30 pm – 3:30 pm

TIME FOR TENANT AND COMMUNITY ORGANIZING
Fed up with rising rents? Already displaced?
Working together makes the difference!

Featured Speaker: Vanessa Riles is Interfaith and Community Organizer for East Bay Housing Organizations.
She will talk about the spring Community Leadership Academy and her earlier experiences as a leader and
community organizer of the Oakland Justice/East 12th Coalition. They won a 2-year campaign, turned around city
policies in 2017, and saved public land for local affordable housing instead of subsidizing a for-profit developer.

Talk, Q&A,and discussion are followed by social time and light refreshments. Join us!

Gray Panthers supports more tenant and senior organizing in Berkeley. We will have applications on hand, but you can also download it at www.ebho.org. Deadline is January 31st.
Berkeley-East Bay Gray Panthers
510-842-6224 * Graypanthersberk@aol.com

 

Education and Action Forum
Every 4th Wednesday of the month, 1:30pm at the South
Berkeley Senior Center
All Ages Welcome, Free and Wheelchair Accessible

65522
Restorative Justice Roundtable @ First Congregational Church of Oakland
Jan 23 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

This presentation is for anyone interested in learning more about how Restorative Justice can change the criminal justice system and stop the school to prison pipeline.

Join in the discussion to create deeper Restorative Practices on a state, county and local level.

RSVP to gamaliel.genesisca@gmail.com

65460
Privacy Lab @ UC Hastings Alumni Reception Center
Jan 23 @ 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm

January 2019 Privacy Lab – Data Privacy Compliance Under the Law: Addressing corporate compliance with evolving US/Int’l. privacy laws.

Bios: The Hastings Intellectual Property Association (HIPA) will host the January Privacy Lab. HIPA is a UC Hastings student organization with the mission to promote and foster the study and practice of intellectual property law for all past, current, and future Hastings students. HIPA recognizes the increasing importance of privacy law and seeks to educate students and the extended legal community on it’s importance through partnership with the Privacy Lab and this event.
The Privacy Lab is co-hosted by the Hastings Career Development Office, who seeks to educate and empower students and alumni on their journey toward professional success and fulfilment.
The panel will be moderated by Taylor Galusha, who is a current UC Hastings 2L, the current HIPA President, a certified CIPP-US privacy professional, and an experienced legal professional pursuing a career in in-house corporate and privacy work. Connect with him at linkedin.com/in/taylorgalusha/.
Description: The January Privacy Lab will be a moderated panel discussion and will consist of attorneys and leaders in privacy law. Data privacy is not a new topic, but has been catching headlines due to companies’ mismanagement of consumers data and large scale data breaches. Corporate legal teams are often tasked with ensuring that data is handled appropriately. These legal teams must stay abreast of new laws addressing data privacy. Given the globalized nature of many consumer services, legal teams must comply with different regulations around the globe, such as GDPR, ePrivacy Regulation, and state-specific privacy laws, such as the evolving California Consumer Privacy Act. This panel will seek to answer not only what data privacy standards must be met, but what standards should be met in anticipation of future laws and the evolving ethical standards of data privacy management.
65476
Jan
24
Thu
ALAMEDA COUNTY CLEAN SLATE CLINIC @ Public Defender's Office
Jan 24 @ 9:00 am – 11:00 am

JOINT WALK‐IN CLINICS with Public Defender and EBCLC

*Please bring your statewide CA DOJ RAP sheet
if you have it or we can give information at clinic*

We may be able to help with:
 Dismissal of Conviction – PC 1203.4
 Felony Reduction / Prop 47 and 64 Relief
 Early Termination of Probation
 Certificate of Rehabilitation
 Sealing Arrest Record – Factual Innocence
 Juvenile Record Sealing
 Post-Conviction Relief for Immigrants and
Survivors of Human Trafficking
 Employment denials due to criminal background
reports
 Occupational Licensing Denials(DSS, Security
Guard)
 Voting Rights, Jury Service Rights

65379
Rally Against The Attack On The Poor @ San Francisco City Hall
Jan 24 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

As DPW continually confiscates property at the behest of the city govt, the BOS appears poised to enact SB-1045, a dangerous bill meant to conserve homeless folks with a prior history of 5150 holds in mental institutions without their consent. The city puts these efforts into attacking the poor while the Bayview is still without even a full service shelter after decades of broken promises. The people of SF demand housing and appropriate services.
Join the Bay Area Landless People’s Alliance in exposing these actions of the city of SF, Oakland and Berkeley. Let’s come together and fight back!

This Rally will create an opportunity for folks to speak on their experiences being harrassed by the Department of Public Works, The police and their local city Government. The scheduled speakers will include Gwendolyn Westbrook (CEO of the United Council of Human services), representatives of the United Front Against Displacement, Berkeley Friends on Wheels, Neither Here nor There.

However, this event is open to all to participate!

65524
Wellstone Club Meeting – Urban Shield, Green New Deal, More @ Humanist Hall
Jan 24 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

The topic for the meeting is Looking to 2019. We’ll be having some speakers who will give us an overview of some of the issues that we’ll be addressing in this coming year. The Agenda for the meeting is attached.

These include:

a. Looking toward 2019/2020; The View from Indivisible Berkeley ­ Daron Sharps
b. Update on Urban Shield and Audit the Sheriff ­ John Lindsay Poland, AFSC
c. The Oakland Teacher’s Strike ­“ Jeremy Wolff, Chair of Political Involvement Committee of OEA
d. An Environmental Agenda for California ­ Judy Pope, 350 East Bay (document attached to the agenda)e. The Green New Deal ­ Isaac Silk and others, Representatives of the Sunrise Movement

Potluck at 6PM — Meeting at 6:45PM (Please bring something to share)

65529
Diversity film ‘100 Years; One woman’s Fight for Justice’ @ Ellen Driscoll Playhouse at Frank Havens School
Jan 24 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

ALSO  1/27/19 @ 12:30 pm @ 474 24th Street, Oakland

When Elouise Cobell, a Blackfeet warrior from Montana, started asking questions about missing money from government-managed Indian Trust accounts, she never imagined that one day she would be taking on the U.S. government. But what she discovered as the Treasurer of her tribe was a trail of fraud and corruption leading all the way from Montana to Washington DC. 100 Years is the story of her 30-year fight for justice for 300,000 Native Americans whose mineral- rich lands were grossly mismanaged by the United States government. In 1996, Cobell filed the largest class action lawsuit ever filed against the federal government. For fifteen long years, and through three Presidential administrations, Elouise Cobell’s unrelenting spirit never quit. This is the compelling true story of how she prevailed and made history.

As a direct result of Cobell’s work, in 2009, President Obama announced the $3.4 billion Cobell Settlement. In 2010, Congress approved the Settlement and in June of 2011 the District Court of D.C. gave it final approval. Settlement checks began to go out to the beneficiaries in 2012. In addition to these payments, a $60 million Cobell Scholarship was established. Following the Settlement, the Obama Administration continued to buy back land from interested landowners, paying fair market price for the land. The purchased land has been returned to the Tribes to manage. With the finalization of the Cobell Settlement, now is the perfect time to tell the story of 100 YEARS: ONE WOMAN’S FIGHT FOR JUSTICE.

In Piedmont, 6:30 Reception, 7:00 film showing. 8:30 community discussion
In Oakland 12:30 showing, then discussion

Free; no need to RSVP.

65514
‘The Judge,’ Film Screening @ Berkeley City College
Jan 24 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

When she was a young lawyer, Kholoud Al-Faqih walked into the office of Palestine’s Chief Justice and announced she wanted to join the bench. He laughed at her. But just a few years later, Kholoud became the first woman judge to be appointed to the Middle East’s Shari’a (Islamic law) courts.

WINNER of the Best Bay Area Documentary Feature at the 2018 San Francisco Film Festival, Official Selection of the 2017 Toronto International Film Festival – also featured on PBS Independent Lens. Directed by Erika Cohn.

“[Judge Kholoud] emerges as someone who’s no threat to religious law, but who’s a real problem for patriarchy.”-New York Times

Watch the trailer! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5VNYkwjG30

“In its engaging fashion it strikes one inspirational note after another as it follows an ambitious, tough-minded and cheerful social revolutionary.”–The Hollywood Reporter

“The film showcases Faqih’s tireless fight for justice for women…”–The Guardian

Benefit for the Middle East Children’s Alliance, wheelchair accessible

65446
No Coal in Richmond Canvasser Training @ Bobby Bowens Progressive Center
Jan 24 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

A critical part of the campaign to end coal exports from Richmond is reaching out to coal-dust–impacted Richmond residents. Going door-to-door is one of the best ways to get the word out to affected neighborhoods. No Coal in Richmond is holding a training session to increase your comfort with canvassing and staffing tables at events. We want to reach residents in several neighborhoods, so lots of volunteers are needed!

You’ll find out residents’ concerns, share information about the health impacts of toxic coal dust, and obtain signatures on a petition to city officials encouraging them to support an ordinance—currently with the city attorney for review—that would phase out coal handling and storage by the Levin-Richmond Terminal.

The training includes a script with talking points and a chance to practice. You’ll leave the event with fliers about the No Coal in Richmond campaign, the petition for signatures—as well as instructions for obtaining signatures via cellphone, a copy of the proposed ordinance, and addresses to canvass. You can even arrange for a canvassing partner. Petition signatures will be used to convince the city council that Richmond residents are opposed to dirty coal in Richmond.

Please RSVP to action@sunflower-alliance.org.  If you can’t make this meeting but want to canvass, let us know.

65511
Jan
25
Fri
A Grand Re-Opening of the Public Domain @ Internet Archives
Jan 25 @ 1:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Please join us on January 25, 2019 for a grand day of celebrating the public domain! Co-hosted by the Internet Archive and Creative Commons, this celebration will feature a keynote address by Lawrence Lessig, lightning talks, demos, multimedia displays and more to mark the “re-opening” of the public domain in the United States. The event will take place at the Internet Archive in San Francisco, and is free and open to the public.

RSVP now before the tickets run out

The public domain is our shared cultural heritage, a near limitless trove of creativity that’s been reused, remixed, and reimagined over centuries to create new works of art and science. The public domain forms the building blocks of culture because these works are not restricted by copyright law. Generally, works come into the public domain when their copyright term expires. But U.S. copyright law has greatly expanded over time, so that now many works don’t enter the public domain for a hundred years or more. Ever since the 1998 Copyright Term Extension Act, no new works have entered the public domain (well, none due to copyright expiration). But for the first time this January, hundreds of books, films, visual art, sheet music, and plays published in 1923 will be free of intellectual property restrictions, and anyone can use them for any purpose at all.

Join creative, legal, library, advocacy communities to celebrate the public domain growing again for the first time in decades, and come network with an amazing lineup of people and organizations who will help us welcome this new class of public domain works. Presenters include Larry Lessig, academic, political activist, and founder of Creative Commons, Corynne McSherry, legal director of the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Cory Doctorow, science fiction author and co-editor of Boing Boing, Pam Samuelson, copyright scholar, Jamie Boyle, the man who literally wrote the book on the public domain, and many others.

In the evening, the celebration continues as we transition to Yerba Buena Center for the Arts for the World Premiere of Paul D. Miller, aka DJ Spooky’s Quantopia: The Evolution of the Internet, a live concert synthesizing data and art, both original and public domain materials, in tribute to the depth and high stakes of free speech and creative expression involved in our daily use of media. Attendees of our Grand Re-Opening of the Public Domain event can get discounted tickets here. If you can’t make the daytime event, separate tickets for Quantopia are available here.

If you’d like to chip in to support the work we do at the Internet Archive, including putting on events like this one, please donate here.

65371
Film Showing: The Young Karl Marx @ Revolution Books
Jan 25 @ 7:00 pm – 9:30 pm

This film that will give you a whole new understanding of the birth and the development of communist revolution. It focuses on five years from 1843 to 1848 and tells the story of the 26-year-old Karl Marx along with Frederick Engels, Jenny Marx, and Mary Burns and their fight to bring a scientific understanding to the revolutionary movement of the times.

65515
Jan
26
Sat
Social Justice Symposium @ Martin Luther King Jr. Middle School
Jan 26 all-day

Thirteenth Annual Social Justice Symposium

The Social Justice Symposium (SJS) is a student-organized event that serves as space for the community to meet and discuss social justice work in the Bay Area.

 

Schedule

This year, our keynote speaker is George Galvis. Galvis holds both a Bachelor of Arts in Ethnic Studies and a Master’s in City Planning from UC Berkeley where he was a Ronald E. McNair Scholar and Public Policy & International Affairs (PPIA) Fellow. Galvis is the co-founder and executive director of Communities United for Restorative Youth Justice (CURYJ, pronounced courage). Galvis advocates for at-risk youth, prisoners and formerly imprisoned individuals with children. He has led statewide advocacy efforts to transform punitive school and juvenile justice policies that disparately impact youth of color and has developed traditional rites of passage programs as healthy alternatives to gang violence.

  • 9:00 — Doors open/Registration
  • 9:30-11:00 — Workshops
  • 11:15-12:00 — Keynote Address
  • 12:15-12:45 — FREE LUNCH
  • 1:00-2:30 — Workshops
65520
Brazilian Socialist Leaders in Conversation @ Niebyl Proctor Library
Jan 26 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Brazilian Socialist Leaders in Conversation: Left Movement-Building and the Global Education Strike Wave

Meet four visiting leaders and federal congresspeople from Brazil’s Party of Socialism and Liberation (PSOL) to discuss their experience building a mass working-class movement in Brazil. A rank-and-file teacher leader from the Oakland Education Association will join in conversation about movement-building lessons for the possible Oakland teachers’ strike.

Recent elections in Brazil brought a far-right leader to the presidency, but at the same time the democratic socialist party PSOL won inspiring gains across the country. The party has become a political center for popular movements for working-class feminism, racial justice, and public education. Mass strikes last year in São Paulo drew hundreds of thousands of students and teachers into action, with one of these PSOL leaders playing a key public role in the fight. PSOL’s programs for popular education in working-class neighborhoods have played a key role in their movement’s growth.

Come join Sâmia Bomfim, Jô Cavalcanti, Fernanda Melchionna, and Talíria Petrone to learn about their movement-building successes in Brazil, and the lessons for organizing in the East Bay.

 

65513
Jan
27
Sun
Potluck before Occupy Oakland General Assembly @ Oscar Grant Plaza or basement of Omni basement if raining
Jan 27 @ 2:00 pm

Feed The People!

The last Sunday of every month attendees of the OO GA get together a little earlier than usual, at 2 PM (3 PM during DST) to share some food with each other and the community.  There should be a table, utensils/plates, meat and veggie entrees and whatnot, courtesy of the Kitchen Committee (such at he is), so just bring yourself, or something to share as well if you’d like.

The Occupy Oakland General Assembly meets every Sunday at 3 PM at the Oscar Grant Plaza amphitheater at 14th Street & Broadway in the amphitheater. If it is raining (as in RAINING, not just misting) at 3:00 PM we meet in the basement of the Omni Collective, 4799 Shattuck Ave., Oakland. During the warmer months we meet at 4 PM at the plaza.

The OO General Assembly has met on a continuous basis for more than five years! Our General Assembly is a participatory gathering of Oakland community members and beyond, where everyone who shows up is treated equally . Our Assembly and the process we have collectively cultivated strives to reach agreement while building community.

At the GA committees, caucuses, and loosely associated groups whose representatives come voluntarily report on past and future actions, with discussion. If you like, just come and hear all the organizing being done! Occupy Oakland encourages political activity that is decentralized and welcomes diverse voices and actions into the movement.

General Assembly Standard Agenda

  1. Welcome & Introductions
  2. Reports from Committees, Caucuses, & Independent Organizations
  3. Announcements
  4. (Optional) Discussion Topic

Occupy Oakland activities and contact info for some Bay Area Groups with past or present Occupy Oakland members.

Occupy Oakland Web Committee: (web@occupyoakland.org)
Occupy Oakland Kitchen Committee: (kitchen@occupyoakland.org)
Strike Debt Bay Area : strikedebtbayarea.tumblr.com
Berkeley Post Office Defenders:http://berkeleypostofficedefenders.wordpress.com/
Alan Blueford Center 4 Justice:https://www.facebook.com/ABC4JUSTICE
Oakland Privacy Working Group:https://oaklandprivacy.wordpress.com
Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity: prisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com/
Bay Area AntiRepression: antirepression@occupyoakland.org
Biblioteca Popular: http://tinyurl.com/mdlzshy
Interfaith Tent: www.facebook.com/InterfaithTent
Port Truckers Solidarity: oaklandporttruckers.wordpress.com
Bay Area Intifada: bayareaintifada.wordpress.com
Transport Workers Solidarity: www.transportworkers.org
Fresh Juice Party (aka Chalkupy) freshjuiceparty.com/chalkupy-gallery
Sudo Room: https://sudoroom.org
Omni Collective: https://omnicommons.org/
First They Came for the Homeless: https://www.facebook.com/pages/First-they-came-for-the-homeless/253882908111999
Sunflower Alliance: http://www.sunflower-alliance.org/
Bay Area Public School: http://thepublicschool.org/bay-area

San Francisco based groups:
Occupy Bay Area United: www.obau.org
Occupy Forum: (see OBAU above)
San Francisco Projection Department: http://tinyurl.com/kpvb3rv

 

59239
Occupy Oakland General Assembly @ Oscar Grant Plaza
Jan 27 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

The Occupy Oakland General Assembly meets every Sunday at 3 PM at Oscar Grant Plaza amphitheater at 14th Street & Broadway near the steps of City Hall.  If for some reason the amphitheater is being used otherwise and/or OGP itself is inaccessible, we will meet at Kaiser Park, right next to the statues, on 19th St. between San Pablo and Telegraph.  If it is raining (as in RAINING, not just misting) at 3:00 PM we meet in the basement of the Omni Collective, 4799 Shattuck Ave., Oakland.  (Note: we meet at 3:00 PM during the cooler months,  once Daylight Savings Time springs forward we tend to assemble at 4 PM).

On every ‘last Sunday’ we meet a little earlier at 2 PM to have a community potluck to which all are welcome.

ooGAOO General Assembly has met on a continuous basis for over five years! Our General Assembly is a participatory gathering of Oakland community members and beyond, where everyone who shows up is treated equally. Our Assembly and the process we have collectively cultivated strives to reach agreement while building community.

At the GA committees, caucuses, and loosely associated groups whose representatives come voluntarily report on past and future actions, with discussion. We encourage everyone participating in the Occupy Oakland GA to be part of at least one associated group, but it is by no means a requirement. If you like, just come and hear all the organizing being done! Occupy Oakland encourages political activity that is decentralized and welcomes diverse voices and actions into the movement.

General Assembly Standard Agenda

  1. Welcome & Introductions
  2. Reports from Committees, Caucuses, & Independent Organizations
  3. Announcements
  4. (Optional) Discussion Topic

Occupy Oakland activities and contact info for some Bay Area Groups with past or present Occupy Oakland members.

Occupy Oakland Web Committee: (web@occupyoakland.org)
Strike Debt Bay Area : strikedebtbayarea.tumblr.com
Berkeley Post Office Defenders:http://berkeleypostofficedefenders.wordpress.com/
Alan Blueford Center 4 Justice:https://www.facebook.com/ABC4JUSTICE
Oakland Privacy Working Group:https://oaklandprivacy.wordpress.com
Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity: prisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com/
Bay Area AntiRepression: antirepression@occupyoakland.org
Biblioteca Popular: http://tinyurl.com/mdlzshy
Interfaith Tent: www.facebook.com/InterfaithTent
Port Truckers Solidarity: oaklandporttruckers.wordpress.com
Bay Area Intifada: bayareaintifada.wordpress.com
Transport Workers Solidarity: www.transportworkers.org
Fresh Juice Party (aka Chalkupy) freshjuiceparty.com/chalkupy-gallery
Sudo Room: https://sudoroom.org
Omni Collective: https://omnicommons.org/
First They Came for the Homeless: https://www.facebook.com/pages/First-they-came-for-the-homeless/253882908111999
Sunflower Alliance: http://www.sunflower-alliance.org/
Bay Area Public School: http://thepublicschool.org/bay-area

San Francisco based groups:
Occupy Bay Area United: www.obau.org
Occupy Forum: (see OBAU above)
San Francisco Projection Department: http://tinyurl.com/kpvb3rv

62637
Screening of shorts from Zapatista Territory @ Omni Commons
Jan 27 @ 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Collection of work from the Zapatista territory by Caitlon Manning

65455
Last Boat Out of Shanghai – Book Launch with Helen Zia @ Oakland Asian Cultural Center
Jan 27 @ 4:30 pm – 7:00 pm
sm_48364070_2072617099451382_8668896320196444160_n.jpg Eastwind Books of Berkeley and Oakland Asian Cultural Center welcome
Journalist and Author
HELEN ZIA
‘Last Boat Out of Shanghai:
The Epic Story of the Chinese Who Fled Mao’s Revolution’

LAST BOAT OUT OF SHANGHAI is the dramatic life stories of four young people caught up in the mass exodus of Shanghai in the wake of China’s 1949 Communist revolution—a heartrending precursor to the struggles faced by emigrants today.

Shanghai has historically been China’s jewel, its richest, most modern and westernized city. The bustling metropolis was home to sophisticated intellectuals, entrepreneurs, and a thriving middle class when Mao’s proletarian revolution emerged victorious from the long civil war. Terrified of the horrors the Communists would wreak upon their lives, citizens of Shanghai who could afford to fled in every direction. Seventy years later, members of the last generation to fully recall this massive exodus have revealed their stories to Chinese American journalist Helen Zia, who interviewed hundreds of exiles about their journey through one of the most tumultuous events of the twentieth century. From these moving accounts, Zia weaves together the stories of four young Shanghai residents who wrestled with the decision to abandon everything for an uncertain life as refugees in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the United States.

Helen Zia is the author of Asian American Dreams: The Emergence of an American People, a finalist for the Kiriyama Pacific Rim Book Prize,. Zia is the co-author, with Wen Ho Lee, of My Country Versus Me: The First-Hand Account by the Los Alamos Scientist Who Was Falsely Accused of Being a Spy. She is also a former executive editor of Ms. magazine. A graduate of Princeton University, she holds an honorary doctor of laws degree from the City University of New York School of Law and lives in the San Francisco Bay Area.

65516