Calendar

9896
Mar
26
Tue
SHOW UP SPEAK OUT: Rise for Berkeley RV Neighbors! @ City Council
Mar 26 @ 6:00 pm – 10:00 pm

ON TUESDAY, MARCH 26th,
Berkeley City Council will vote on “Managing Recreational (RV) Parking:”

Berkeley Municipal Code 14.40.120 bans “parking between two a.m. and five a.m” for ALL RVs and VAN and CAR CAMPERS. City Council already voted on February 28th to PASS THIS ORDINANCE with a 6-3 vote.

TUESDAY, March 26th is the final vote.

It’s time for Berkeley residents to show up and demand their neighbors not be displaced! We will protest at city council and demand our voices be heard. Sanctuary for who? The many not the few!

66151
A Memoir of Witness and Resistance @ Hillside Club
Mar 26 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm


Advance tickets: $12: brownpapertickets.com :: T: 800-838-3006  or
Pegasus Books (3 sites),
Moe’s,
Books Inc (Berkeley),
Walden Pond Bookstore,
East Bay Books,
Mrs. Dalloway’s

 

“This luminous book stands beside the memoirs of Pablo Neruda and Czeslaw Milosz in its account of a poet’s education, the struggle of a great artist to be worthy of her gifts. Carolyn Forché’s prose is shamanic: it sees both the surface of things and their inner workings, it animates the inanimate world.”
— Garth Greenwell, author of What Belongs to You

Carolyn Forché is one of the most gifted poets of her generation. Her work—including Blue Hour, The Angel of History, The Country Between Us, and Gathering the Tribes—has been translated into more than twenty languages. She has received the Windham-Campbell Prize and the Academy of American Poets Fellowship.
For decades the story of how Carolyn became an effective activist has not been told. At last, in her shimmering, gripping prose, we learn how a fateful encounter and a radical act of empathy changed the course of her life. Carolyn was twenty-seven when a mysterious stranger appeared on her doorstep— a charming polymath with a mind as seemingly disordered as it was brilliant. She’d heard rumors about who he might be: a lone wolf, a communist, a CIA operative, a sharpshooter, a revolutionary, a coffee farmer…He had driven from El Salvador to invite her to his country. Captivated, she accepted and became enmeshed in something beyond her comprehension; they meet with high-ranking military officers, impoverished farm workers, and clergy desperately trying to assist the poor and keep the peace. These encounters are a part of his plan to educate her. As priests and farm-workers are murdered and protest marches attacked, Carolyn is swept up in his work and in the lives of his friends. Pursued by death squads, sheltering in safe houses, the two forge a rich friendship as she attempts to make sense of what she’s experiencing and establish a moral foothold amidst profound suffering. She learns how she can act as a witness and translate that into an art that might illumine the lives of others. That is “the poetry of witness,” and she has proven to be one of North America’s rare practitioners.

What You Have Heard Is True— a riveting and essential account of a young woman’s political awakening— is as beautiful as it is painful to read.”
— Claire Messud, author of The Burning Girl

KPFA benefit

65753
Mar
27
Wed
ELLA BAKER UNSHELTERED CRISIS COMMITTEE MEETING @ Ella Baker Center office
Mar 27 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

65817
Mar
28
Thu
Beer and Roses DSA Labor Social @ Blind Tiger
Mar 28 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Join East Bay DSA’s Labor Committee for their regular Beer and Roses Social!

Hang out with other members who are interested in the labor movement, hear about what’s happening in the East Bay DSA Labor Committee, and learn how you can get involved!

 

65416
Woman’s History Month Movie Night – “What Happened, Miss Simone?” @ East Bay Community Space
Mar 28 @ 7:00 pm – 10:00 pm
Woman's History Month Movie Night - "What Happened, Miss Simone?"
Come enjoy this great film about the trail blazing Nina Simone, followed by some time to discuss the film.
66134
Author Event: Our History is Our Future @ St. Johns Presbyterian Church
Mar 28 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

KPFA Radio 94.1 FM presents


Advance tickets: $12: brownpapertickets.com :: T: 800-838-3006 or

Pegasus Books (3 sites),
Books Inc (Berkeley),
Moe’s,
Walden Pond Bookstore,
East Bay Books
Mrs. Dalloway’s
$15 door

 

“This extraordinary history of resistance counters the myth of Indigenous disappearance and insignificance while calling into question the very notion that resistance itself is impossible in a world saturated by capital and atrophying inequality. This is a radical Indigenous history in its finest form.”  —Audra Simpson, author of Mohawk Interruptus

 

In 2016, a small protest encampment at the Standing Rock reservation in North Dakota, initially established to block construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline, grew to be the largest Indigenous protest movement in the twenty-first century, attracting tens of thousands of Indigenous and non-Native allies from around the world. Its slogan – “Mni Wiconi” – Water is Life – was about more than just a pipeline. Water protectors knew this battle for Native sovereignty had already been fought many times before, and that even after the encampment was gone their anti-colonial struggle would continue. In Our History is the Future, Nick Estes traces traditions of Indigenous resistance from the days of the Missouri River trading forts through the Indian Wars, the Pick-Sloan Dams, the American Indian Movement and the campaign for Indigenous Rights at the United Nations. While a historian by trade, Estes also draws on personal observations from the encampments and from his own growing up as a citizen of Oceti Sakowin (the Nation of the Seven Council Fires), making this book a work of authentic history, a personal story, and a stirring manifesto for native liberation.

 

“This book is a jewel—history and analysis that reads like the best poetry—certain to be a classic work as well as a study guide for continued and accelerated resistance.”

—Roxanne Dunbar Ortiz, author ofAn Indigenous People’s History of the United States

 

Nick Estes, a citizen of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe, is an Assistant Professor of American Studies at the University of New Mexico, and a co-founder of The Red Nation, an organization dedicated to native liberation. Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz grew up in rural Oklahoma, the daughter of a tenant farmer and part-Indian mother. She is the author of many books, including Outlaw Woman, a memoir of her time in an armed underground group, Red Dirt: Growing up Okie, and Blood On the Border: A Memoir of the Contra War,and the recent, widely acclaimed An Indigenous People’s History of the United States. 

KPFA benefit

66135
Mar
29
Fri
Bay Area Landless People’s Alliance @ Omni Commons
Mar 29 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Bay Area Landless People’s Alliance meeting to discuss plans, outreach, organizing regarding regional homeless communities and organizations.

For more info: https://www.facebook.com/groups/541837129562482/

65818
Mar
30
Sat
5th Annual Shut Down Creech! SPRING 2019 @ Creech Air Force Base
Mar 30 all-day

National Mobilization to Peacefully Stop U.S. Drone Wars
 March 30 – April 5, 2019
(Saturday through Friday)

Our beautiful, weeklong peaceful convergence in the Nevada Desert is almost here!   We can’t wait to see you all, and work together to GROUND the DRONES!
Please register HERE, so we can best serve everyone.

This is a special year because it marks the 10th anniversary of Bay Area CODEPINK’s twice yearly resistance to killer drones at Creech Air Force Base.  It is also marks the 5th annual national mobilization known as “SHUT DOWN CREECH.”  Help us make this push for peace exceptional!  Be there!

Special theme:  In solidarity with the national call to action to protest the 70th anniversary of NATO Summit in Washington DC, we will devote one day at Creech promoting: “ABOLISH NATO, DE-MILITARIZE NOW!”
Please come for part or all of this amazing Peace Convergence to nonviolently resist the illegal U.S. drone targeted assassination program.  Stay at the newly relocated CAMP JUSTICE peace encampment, set up on the “Goddess Temple” grounds, 3 miles from Creech AFB.  Most meals provided. We will send you a transportation form after you register with us, to coordinate ride shares to/from Camp Justice & Las Vegas.  Click on tabs at the top of this page for detailed info about:   Housing, Transportation, Camp Justice, Meals, Sponsorship, Registration, etc.
65867
California Progressive Alliance founding convention @ San Luis Obispo Guild Hall
Mar 30 – Mar 31 all-day

The new California Progressive Alliance seeks to elevate progressive ideas; promote the creation of local political alliances and coalitions for political power; support corporate-free progressive candidates and issue-based electoral campaigns; and expand the communication and dialogue among all our progressive family in the state of California, respecting and supporting the work done by all.

The CPA is having is founding convention in San Luis Obispo March 30-31!

Register by January 31 and get 25% off with early bird registration for our founding Convention in San Luis Obispo March 30-31. Speakers include former Supervisor and VP candidate Matt Gonzalez, SLO Mayor Heidi Harmon, former Richmond Mayor Gayle McLaughlin, and panels on our 2019 priorities. Organize with us!

Remember, to vote on proposals, officers, and founding documents, you must be a dues-paying CPA member (all are welcome at the convention!). Join now, here.

65533
What does Zapatista autonomy mean for us in the US? @ Omni Commons
Mar 30 @ 10:30 am – 1:00 pm

You’re Invited to a Breakfast of Waffles & Zapatismo!

Zapatista Autonomy:
Challenging Solidarity & Organizing in the U.S.

* 10:30am Waffles, coffee, getting to know each other
* 11:00 a.m. Pablo Gonzalez presentation with discussion.

On Pablo Gonzalez

Pablo Gonzalez teaches at UC Berkeley. A first generation Chicano scholar-activist/anthropologist, Pablo is immersed in studying the political and cultural resonance of social movements. In particular, the resonance of Indigenous social movements on Chicanas/os and people of color in the U.S.

Gonzalez has a book manuscript, “Autonomy Road: The Cultural Politics of Chicana/o Autonomous Organizing in Los Angeles California,” which describes a 20-year history of solidarity and political organizing between Chicana/o communities in the U.S. and the Zapatista indigenous communities of Chiapas, Mexico.

The Chiapas Support Committee invites you to join us for a community breakfast and a discussion to deepen our understanding of and relationships with the struggles of Zapatista and Indigenous communities in Mexico and what solidarity looks like in the current political and economic climate. Expressing and organizing solidarity has many race, gender, class facets. How do we speak about Indigenous struggles, how are they linked to our struggles in the U.S., what is the task and responsibility (if any) of U.S.-based social justice movements, anti-racist, environmental justice, racial justice and Indigenous struggles and movements?

We have more questions than answers. The discussion requires we ask the right and critical questions in time and reflect and organize. What are your questions?

Join us in an urgent and intimate dialogue and discussion of what matters most to us in this period of rising capitalist strife and repression.

PLUS HOLD THE DATE:
¡Viva Zapata!
Zapata Across the Borders: Image & Reality
Film Screening & Discussion of the Marlon Brando classic: ¡Viva Zapata!
Also at the Omni
Sat. April 13, 2019, 7 pm
$5-10 donation at the door

For more info:
www.chiapas-support.org

66034
No Coal in Richmond Canvassing @ Bobby Bowens Progressive Center
Mar 30 @ 1:30 pm – 4:00 pm

​If you learned that coal dust containing arsenic, lead, mercury, and cadmium was blowing through your neighborhood, wouldn’t you want to take action? Come help No Coal in Richmond reach out to as many residents as possible between now and late March or early April. That’s when the Richmond City Council will vote on an ordinance to prohibit new coal or pet coke facilities, prevent the Levin-Richmond Terminal from expanding, and phase out existing coal handling and storage.

​We have less than a month to reach the most affected Richmond residents about the massive amounts of coal-for-export coming through their neighborhoods in 100-car trains of open rail cars and sitting in uncovered piles next to the Bay, just blocks from homes, schools, and workplaces.

We’re door-knocking every weekend between now and late March or early April to
collect emails and signatures on a letter to the council demanding the strongest
possible ordinance.

And talk about gratifying! Nearly all those who answer the door say, “No coal in
Richmond? Where do I sign?” and proceed to thank you profusely for doing this.
Check out the new and improved No Coal in Richmond website for background, up-
to-the minute news, and other ways you can fight this climate and public health
menace in Richmond.

 

RSVP:  ACTION@SUNFLOWER-ALLIANCE.ORG

65863
Mar
31
Sun
Antidotes to White Fragility Workshop @ Sierra Club
Mar 31 @ 10:00 am – 1:00 pm

What skills, tools and approaches are useful in encouraging white people to sustain balanced engagement with anti-racism/racial justice education and work? How can we cultivate resilience (as opposed to white fragility) in ourselves, our communities, and our movements?

White Fragility is defined by Robin DiAngelo as “A state in which even a minimum amount of racial stress becomes intolerable, triggering a range of defensive moves. These moves include the outward display of emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and behaviors such as argumentation, silence, and leaving the stress-inducing situation (2011).” What skills, tools and approaches are useful in encouraging white people to sustain balanced engagement with anti-racism/racial justice education and work? How can we cultivate resilience (as opposed to white fragility) in ourselves, our communities, and our movements? Resilience is, in part, defined as:

1. Staying with the conversation

2. Giving and receiving information and feedback from facilitators and peers without becoming highly defensive, reactive, or shut down/dissociated for long period of time

3. Managing the guilt and shame that can arise in learning about the history and current reality of race and racism in the US.

This workshop will explore the role of the body, community, spirituality, intellectual knowledge and other themes that you bring from your experience. We will cover basic information about how the brain and body responds to perceived threats, and explore how to work with this toward greater resilience in moments of challenge.

This workshop is for all experience levels. Participants will be invited to discuss in small groups, move around the space, and hold their bodies in different shapes for 1-2 minutes if available. Content will be presented in both verbal and written formats.

65748
Democratic Socialism: An Impossible Dream? @ Niebyl Proctor Library
Mar 31 @ 10:30 am – 12:30 pm

Is industrial civilization compatible with economic democracy, or is democratic socialism impossible in a globalized industrial society?  This presentation will examine the powerful material conditions that have frustrated every effort to replace capitalism with genuine democratic socialism.  Hopefully, this will become the starting point for a discussion about what kinds of energy sources and technologies are most conducive to democratic control.


Strongly suggested background reading:
https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/11/30/democratic-socialism-the-impossible-dream/
https://www.counterpunch.org/2019/02/01/why-did-socialism-fail/


Craig Collins, Ph.D. 
is the author of Toxic Loopholes (Cambridge University Press), which examines America’s dysfunctional system of environmental protection. He teaches political science and environmental law at California State University East Bay and was a founding member of the Green Party of California.

His forthcoming books: Marx & Mother Nature and Rising From the Ruins: Catabolic Capitalism & Green Resistance reformulate Marx’s theory of history & social change and examine the emerging struggle to replace catabolic capitalism with a thriving, just, ecologically resilient society.

66138
What Can We Do About Mass Incarceration? @ First Unitarian Church of Oakland
Mar 31 @ 12:15 pm – 1:30 pm


Panel and Dialog:

Jose Bernal: Senior Organizer Ella Baker Center for Human Rights. Serves on the S.F. Reentry Council; advocates for restorative justice policies; spearheaded campaigns to de-privatize reentry services and end gang  injunctions. Graduate of Stanford University’s Project ReMade program, a course aimed at empowering the formerly incarcerated.

Jonathon Simon: directs the Center for the Study of Law and Society at UC and teaches about punishment, prisons, and mass incarceration. His books include, Governing through Crime: How the War on Crime Transformed American Society and Created a Culture of Fear (2009) and Mass Incarceration on Trial: A Remarkable Court Decision and the Future of Prisons in America (2014). Simon believes that invoking human dignity can fuel efforts to change the direction of the carceral state. Listen to his interview on Dignity and The Carceral State: https://kpfa.org/episode/against-the-grain-april-4-2018/

Starr King Room-light lunch provided

66028
Sunflower Alliance @ Bobby Bowens Progressive Center
Mar 31 @ 12:30 pm – 3:00 pm

 

 

66132
Hands Off Venezuela @ Federal Building
Mar 31 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

march_31_demo.pdf_600_.jpg

66141
Potluck before Occupy Oakland General Assembly @ Oscar Grant Plaza
Mar 31 @ 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Feed The People!

The last Sunday of every month attendees of the OO GA get together a little earlier than usual, at 3 PM (2 PM during cooler months) to share some food with each other and the community.  There should be a table, utensils/plates, meat and veggie entrees and whatnot, courtesy of the Kitchen Committee (such at he is), so just bring yourself, or something to share as well if you’d like.

After the meal the Occupy Oakland General Assembly meets Sundays at 4 PM at the Oscar Grant Plaza amphitheater at 14th Street & Broadway. If it is raining (as in RAINING, not just misting) at 4:00 PM we meet in the basement of the Omni Collective, 4799 Shattuck Ave., Oakland. During Daylights Losing Time in the Winter we meet at 3 PM at the plaza, & again, we retreat to the Omni if the rain is a pain.

The OO General Assembly has met on a continuous basis for more than six years! Our General Assembly is a participatory gathering of Oakland community members and beyond, where everyone who shows up is treated equally. Our Assembly and the process we have collectively cultivated strives to reach agreement while building community.

At the GA committees, caucuses, and loosely associated groups whose representatives come voluntarily report on past and future actions, with discussion. If you like, just come and hear all the organizing being done! Occupy Oakland encourages political activity that is decentralized and welcomes diverse voices and actions into the movement.

General Assembly Standard Agenda

  1. Welcome & Introductions
  2. Reports from Committees, Caucuses, & Independent Organizations
  3. Announcements
  4. (Optional) Discussion Topic

Occupy Oakland activities and contact info for some Bay Area Groups with past or present Occupy Oakland members.

Occupy Oakland Web Committee: (web@occupyoakland.org)
Occupy Oakland Kitchen Committee: (kitchen@occupyoakland.org)
Strike Debt Bay Area : strikedebtbayarea.tumblr.com
Berkeley Post Office Defenders:http://berkeleypostofficedefenders.wordpress.com/
Alan Blueford Center 4 Justice:https://www.facebook.com/ABC4JUSTICE
Oakland Privacy Working Group:https://oaklandprivacy.wordpress.com
Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity: prisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com/
Bay Area AntiRepression: antirepression@occupyoakland.org
Biblioteca Popular: http://tinyurl.com/mdlzshy
Interfaith Tent: www.facebook.com/InterfaithTent
Port Truckers Solidarity: oaklandporttruckers.wordpress.com
Bay Area Intifada: bayareaintifada.wordpress.com
Transport Workers Solidarity: www.transportworkers.org
Fresh Juice Party (aka Chalkupy) freshjuiceparty.com/chalkupy-gallery
Sudo Room: https://sudoroom.org
Omni Collective: https://omnicommons.org/
First They Came for the Homeless: https://www.facebook.com/pages/First-they-came-for-the-homeless/253882908111999
Sunflower Alliance: http://www.sunflower-alliance.org/
Bay Area Public School: http://thepublicschool.org/bay-area

San Francisco based groups:
Occupy Bay Area United: www.obau.org
Occupy Forum: (see OBAU above)
San Francisco Projection Department: http://tinyurl.com/kpvb3rv

 

64399
TANC General Assembly @ Omni Commons
Mar 31 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm
This month we’re continuing to try out a new day/time for our assembly: Sunday afternoon!

For this February assembly, we’ll be preparing to protest: TANC is planning a rally for sometime in the next couple months. We’ll also be brainstorming a longer-term project to work with the public housing. We’ll also be checking up on other projects, including tenant councils.

Let’s get organized against the Bay Area housing market!

Our general assemblies are open and free for anyone to join. We’ll be discussing ongoing projects: tenant organizing, houseless organizing, public housing organizing and more. Rent is too high, and we’ve got to organize and fight against marketized housing. Come through and let’s get organized against the housing market!

– – – – – – – – – – – –

We are a group of Bay Area tenants who are fed up with rising rents, evictions, and harassment at the hands of landlords. We are fed up with our neighbors having no option but to live unsheltered and at constant risk of police harassment. We want to stop landlords, developers, and cops from looting our communities.

A council is a group of tenants who work together to wield collective power against a shared landlord in order to improve their conditions. While, in general, councils may organize for more affordable, habitable, and safer housing, the issues that a council decides to organize around is ultimately dictated by its members. Councils can be powerful because they can directly apply their collective pressure on their landlord without the permission of city hall or other third parties.

TANC will help organize councils and bring them together as a network. While councils interface directly with their landlord, they can find support from other councils who rent from different landlords. We will assist in getting the word out to tenants and researching landlords. Neighbors will get to know each other during dinners, BBQs, and other events that TANC will support. We will compile complaints that are common across councils and aid in seeking their resolution. Councils will discuss and demand timely repairs, and support tenants threatened with eviction. Ultimately, the point is to reconfigure power dynamics of landlords and tenants in the Bay Area.

65700
Occupy Oakland General Assembly @ Oscar Grant Plaza
Mar 31 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

The Occupy Oakland General Assembly meets every Sunday at 4 PM at Oscar Grant Plaza amphitheater at 14th Street & Broadway near the steps of City Hall. If for some reason the amphitheater is being used otherwise and/or OGP itself is inaccessible, we will meet at Kaiser Park, right next to the statues, on 19th St. between San Pablo and Telegraph. If it is raining (as in RAINING, not just misting) at 4:00 PM we meet in the basement of the Omni Collective, 4799 Shattuck Ave., Oakland. (Note: we tend to meet at 3:00 PM during the cooler months from November to early March after Daylights Savings Time.)

On every ‘last Sunday’ we meet a little earlier at 3 PM to have a community potluck to which all are welcome.

OO General Assembly has met on a continuous basis for over six years, since October 2011! Our General Assembly is a participatory gathering of Oakland community members and beyond, where everyone who shows up is treated equally. Our Assembly and the process we have collectively cultivated strives to reach agreement while building community.

At the GA committees, caucuses, and loosely associated groups whose representatives come voluntarily report on past and future actions, with discussion. We encourage everyone participating in the Occupy Oakland GA to be part of at least one associated group, but it is by no means a requirement. If you like, just come and hear all the organizing being done! Occupy Oakland encourages political activity that is decentralized and welcomes diverse voices and actions into the movement.

General Assembly Standard Agenda

Welcome & Introductions
Reports from Committees, Caucuses, & Independent Organizations
Announcements
(Optional) Discussion Topic

Occupy Oakland activities and contact info for some Bay Area Groups with past or present Occupy Oakland members.

Occupy Oakland Web Committee: (web@occupyoakland.org)
Strike Debt Bay Area : strikedebtbayarea.tumblr.com
Berkeley Post Office Defenders:http://berkeleypostofficedefenders.wordpress.com/
Alan Blueford Center 4 Justice:https://www.facebook.com/ABC4JUSTICE
Oakland Privacy Working Group:https://oaklandprivacy.wordpress.com
Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity: prisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com/
Bay Area AntiRepression: antirepression@occupyoakland.org
Biblioteca Popular: http://tinyurl.com/mdlzshy
Interfaith Tent: www.facebook.com/InterfaithTent
Port Truckers Solidarity: oaklandporttruckers.wordpress.com
Bay Area Intifada: bayareaintifada.wordpress.com
Transport Workers Solidarity: www.transportworkers.org
Fresh Juice Party (aka Chalkupy) freshjuiceparty.com/chalkupy-gallery
Sudo Room: https://sudoroom.org
Omni Collective: https://omnicommons.org/
First They Came for the Homeless: https://www.facebook.com/pages/First-they-came-for-the-homeless/253882908111999
Sunflower Alliance: http://www.sunflower-alliance.org/
Bay Area Public School: http://thepublicschool.org/bay-area

San Francisco based groups:
Occupy Bay Area United: www.obau.org
Occupy Forum: (see OBAU above)
San Francisco Projection Department: http://tinyurl.com/kpvb3rv

64398
Free Dinner and a Movie Discussion Night – Oakland Greens @ It's Your Move Games
Mar 31 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm
The Oakland Greens 2019 FREE Dinner and a Movie discussion series.
“I am Not Your Negro” 2016”
These Happen on the “Last Sundays” of every month @ It’s Your Move Games 4920 Telegraph Ave, in the historic Temescal district.

The system thinks we are appeased with a so called “Black History Month” well in my world every moment was a moment to explore how our past effects our present. Still for February we will show
“I Am Not Your Negro”.

In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing his next project, “Remember This House.”
The book was to be a revolutionary, personal account of the lives and assassinations of three of his close friends: Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. At the time of Baldwin’s death in 1987, he left behind only 30 completed pages of this manuscript. Filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished.
As usual, the doors at the It’s Your Move Games and Hobbies store will open at 6:30 p.m., a free dinner will be provided at 7 p.m., and the movie will start promptly at 7:30 p.m.
65437