Calendar

9896
Oct
11
Thu
Secure Scuttlebutt (SSB) Night @ Omni Commons
Oct 11 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Secure Scuttlebutt (SSB) is a decent(ralised) secure gossip platform. Imagine if Facebook or Twitter was run by its users, could be extended by anyone, offered cryptographic security, and required no centralized infrastructure!

Come by and learn more about SSB, ask questions, get set up on one of the several client programs, and be free from oppressive centralized social networks.

Read more at https://www.scuttlebutt.nz

65165
Exiled: From the Killing Fields of Cambodia to California and Back @ Pegasus Bookstore
Oct 11 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

 

Katya Cengel discusses Exiled: From the Killing Fields of Cambodia to California and Back.

“Exiled” traces the story of violence through three generations of Cambodian-Americans by profiling a handful of families. It begins with the grandparents, the elderly who will soon be too old to tell their stories of survival. The violence they endured is recognized as the most brutal, a genocide that killed an estimated 20 percent of the Cambodian population. In Cambodia, the criminals have never fully been brought to justice and the victims remain largely silent. The silence is the same in the United States, where survivors have tried to leave their memories of random killing behind. But trauma like that cannot be escaped so easily, and it followed them, seeping back into their families through their children. The guidance, support and care they were often too traumatized to give their children left those same children vulnerable to gang recruitment. The second generation came of age amidst the violence of the past and the present.

The U.S. deported the criminals who did not hold citizenship, sending them back to a homeland their parents had given up everything to escape. They had neither the practical nor emotional skills to cope and their home country offered little help. In Cambodia they succumb to addiction and mental illness in large numbers. Then there is the third generation, the children, the ones still in America growing up without fathers and mothers, subjected to the violence of loss and longing. This is a story about how regimes as brutal as the Khmer Rouge and as benign as the United States have kept alive a legacy of violence and loss. There are no easy answers here, just the words of survivors and their descendants.
Katya Cengel is a freelance writer based in San Luis Obispo, California, and lectures in the Journalism Department of California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo. She was a features and news writer for the Louisville Courier-Journal from 2003 to 2011 and has reported from North and Central America, Europe, Asia, and Africa. Her work has appeared in New York Times Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, the Washington PostMarie Claire, and Newsweek. She is the author of Bluegrass Baseball: A Year in the Minor League Life (Nebraska, 2012).

65117
The Dark Shadow of Tech on the S.F. Bay Area @ First Congregational Church
Oct 11 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

advance tickets: $12 : Books Inc (Berkeley), Pegasus Books (3 sites), Moes, Walden Pond Bookstore, Mrs. Dalloways. East Bay Books,    $15 door, KPFA benefit.

Cary McClelland is a writer, filmmaker, lawyer, and rights advocate.  His book is an eye-opening portrait of San Francisco transformed by the tech boom. Famously home to artists and activists, the birthplace of the Beats, the Black Panthers, and the LGBTQ movementin recent decades the Bay Area has been reshaped by Silicon Valley, the engine of the new American economy. The richer the region gets, the more unequal and less diverse it becomes. Cracks in the citys facaderapid gentrification, an epidemic of evictions, rising crime, atrophied public institutionshave started to appear. Cary McClelland spent several years interviewing people at the epicenter of the recent change, from venture capitalists and coders to politicians and protesters, from native sons and daughters to the citys newest arrivals. We hear from people who have passed through Apple, Google, eBay, Intel, and the other big tech companies of our time. We meet those who are experiencing changes at the grassroots level: a homeless advocate in Haight-Ashbury, an Oakland rapper, a pawnbroker in the Mission, a man who helped dismantle and rebuild the Bay Bridge, and many fascinating others.

Richard A. Walker is professor emeritus of geography at the University of California, Berkeley where he taught from 1975 to 2012. He has written on a diverse range of topics in economic, urban, and environmental geography, with scores of published articles to his credit. He is co-author of The Capitalist Imperative (1989) and The New Social Economy (1992) and has written extensively on California, including The Conquest of Bread (2004), The Country in the City (2007) and The Atlas of California (2013). Walker is currently director of the Living New Deal Project, whose purpose is to inventory all New Deal public works sites in the U.S. and recover the lost memory of government investment for the good of all.

Sasha Lilley is a writer and radio broadcaster. Shes the host of KPFAs critically acclaimed program of radical ideas, Against the Grain, and the series editor of PM Press political economy imprint Spectre. Her books include Capital and Its Discontents and Catastrophism: The Apocalyptic Political Collapse and Rebirth.

65133
Oct
12
Fri
Adios Amor: The Search for Maria Moreno. Film Screening. @ Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union
Oct 12 @ 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Film screening followed by Q+A with Director Laurie Coyle and Maria Moreno’s daughters, Olivia Portugal and Lily DeLa Torre

In Adios Amor, the discovery of lost photographs sparks the search for a hero that history forgot — Maria Moreno, a migrant mother driven to speak out by her twelve children’s hunger. She was the first farmworker woman in America to be hired as a union organizer and became an outspoken leader in an era when women were relegated to the background.

In 1961, UC Berkeley students invited farmworker labor leader Maria Moreno to speak on campus, where she received a standing ovation. A trailblazing activist who paved the way for Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta, Maria was forgotten and her legacy buried. Now she’s back to tell her story in an inspiring new documentary.

This event is free and open to the public. Food and drinks will be provided. The MCC is ADA accessible.

Please register for the event by visiting us on Eventbrite or through our Facebook event page.

Co-sponsored by Chicanx Latinx Student DevelopmentCenter for Latino Policy Research, and Ethnic Studies Department

To learn more about the film please visit Adios Amor webpage: https://www.adiosamorfilm.com/

65142
Attica – a Documentary film. Part of Revolutionary University. @ South Berkeley Senior Center
Oct 12 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Attica – a documentary film by Cinda Firestone

This film documents the events that began on September 9, 1971 when inmates at Attica State Prison seized the prison for four days after months of protesting inhumane conditions. The uprising resulted in the death of 43 people after state troopers were called in to put down the rebellion

This event is the opening night of a three day Revolutionary University

Join us for three days of presentations and discussions to help us understand our current conditions and the problems we face under capitalism. Most importantly, we will talk about the kind of organizing necessary in order to change these conditions and create the kind of society that we need.

For more info:
https://revolutionaryworkers.org/revolutionary-university-fall-2018-oct-12-14/

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65161
Bay Area Landless People’s Alliance General Meeting @ Omni Commons
Oct 12 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Bay Area Landless Peoples Alliance:

Regional meeting of landless activists of the San Francisco Bay Area

65092
Movies Under the Stars: Labor Film Classics @ National Nursed United HQ
Oct 12 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

65085
Oct
13
Sat
Revolutionary University @ South Berkeley Senior Center
Oct 13 all-day

Join us for three days of presentations and discussions to help us understand our current conditions and the problems we face under capitalism. Most importantly, we will talk about the kind of organizing necessary in order to change these conditions and create the kind of society that we need.

Friday 10/12

6:30pm-9:00pm
Attica – a documentary film by Cinda Firestone

This film documents the events that began on September 9, 1971 when inmates at Attica State Prison seized the prison for four days after months of protesting inhumane conditions. The uprising resulted in the death of 43 people after state troopers were called in to put down the rebellion.

Saturday 10/13

10:30am-12:30pm
The Crisis of Civilization and How to Resolve It: An Introduction to Ecocentric Socialism

Kamran Nayeri is the publisher and editor of “Our Place in the World: A Journal of Ecosocialism”. Political Economist emeritus, UC Berkeley

1:30pm-3:00pm
The Middle East in the Era of Trump

Prof. As’ad AbuKhalil, Professor of Political Science at CSU Stanislaus and author of Saudi Arabia and the U.S.

3:30pm-5:00pm
The “Gig Economy”: A New Form of Servitude for the Working Class?

Keally McBride is a Professor of Politics at the University of San Francisco. She teaches and publishes on a wide variety of topics, including punishment, law, decolonization, revolutions and political economy.

6:30pm-8:00pm
France: In The Streets, Workplaces, Universities, Schools & Hospitals

Gilles Kobry, an activist in the French Trotskyist group, Fraction L’Etincelle, will discuss the recent struggles against the Macron government’s enforcement of the Labor Law in France, as well as attacks on access to public education and the challenges facing the workers in France and throughout Europe.

Sunday 10/14

2:00pm-3:30pm
Sports And Capitalism – How Sports are Used to Squeeze Public Money for Private Profit

Jules Boykoff, former professional soccer player, currently teaches political science at Pacific University in Oregon. Co-sponsored by the Anthropology and Social Change department at California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco

4:00pm-5:30pm
The Challenges We Face Today – Short-Term Mobilizing or Organizing for Real Social Change

A presentation by Speak Out Now (Revolutionary Workers Group) activists, followed by discussion and time to socialize. Refreshments and snacks provided.

65163
Organizing for Effective Police Oversight – Berkeley @ Media Center
Oct 13 @ 1:00 pm – 3:00 pm

The situation with the lack police accountability in Berkeley has become critical. At this point, the police and their union have been able to compel the city to continue its participation in the Urban Shield military style exercises, scuttle the proposal for an empowered police commission and extract a 9% raise for their already well paid officers.

Despite the known dangers of cyber stalking, we have seen BPD tweet out the identities of anti-fascist protestors and secretly record police stops and then leak the information to the press as a way to humiliate an African American City Councilmember. While refusing to provide basic information via Public Record Act requests and denying the most basic right to watch even to Police Review Commissioners Berkeley police are a partisan political entity unto themselves.

This has got to stop.

We need a powerful coalition to take charge of policy and practice regarding the Berkeley Police Department. It is not tolerable to allow the abdication of power to a department that is more than willing to conceal or release information as suits its need to “control the narrative”.

Please join us! Berkeley Copwatch along with The Way Church and more organizations to a meeting to discuss new strategies for Public Safety and Community Control of the Police. We need a new vision of how to control police functioning and break the structural barriers that allow and lead to police misconduct.


65104
Learning Club: No Wall They Can Build @ Omni Commons
Oct 13 @ 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

The tech industry has been shaken by calls from workers at companies including Microsoft, Amazon, and Salesforce to stop collaborating with Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE). The outrage, sparked by stories of children being brutally separated from their parents, led many to call for the abolition of ICE.

What would it take to abolish ICE? What is leading so many people to seek refuge in the US in the first place? In solidarity with those impacted by the actions of this agency, we must not only call to abolish ICE but also ask why people are leaving their homes, risking their lives, in search of refuge.

No Wall They Can Build, written by a former desert aid worker, collects the stories of those who make the journey and outlines the forces driving people to the border.

Readings + materials
https://sites.google.com/view/tech-workers-coalition/topics/no-wall-they-can-build?authuser=0

65147
Sanctuary City – Active Hope @ BFUU
Oct 13 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

In October, Berkeley may become the 2nd city, following Richmond, to cut municipal contracts with ICE data brokers. The Sanctuary City Contracting ordinance, which ends city business with companies that send information to ICE, will be in front of the City Council in the town where sanctuary was born. Berkeley’s Federation of Unitarian Universalists will talk about it, along with many other social justice efforts, at Active Hope.

Talks:

Action Updates
Tracy Rosenberg/ Sanctuary City ordinance
Shahid Buttar/Kavanaugh
Susan Harman/ Public Bank
David Peattie, Steve Murphy/ Indivisible Berkeley Economic Justice Team: Break Up With Your Bank
Sandy Emerson/ Fossil Free California
Kelly Curry/ Peace Economy and Planting Justice
Ann Symens-Bucher/ Canticle Farm
Janet Scholl Johnson/ Sunflower Alliance
Virginia Hollins-Davidson/ Poor People’s Campaign

CP introduce David Swanson
David Swanson
Q & A

Wrap up, Thank yous
Book signing and sales
Pie extravaganza (selling slices to benefit CODEPINK)

65095
Strike Debt Bay Area: Debt Resistance is NOT Futile! @ Omni Commons
Oct 13 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

Strike Debt is building a debt resistance movement. We believe that most individual debt is illegitimate and unjust. Most of us fall into debt because we are increasingly deprived of the means to acquire the basic necessities of life: health care, education, and housing. Because we are forced to go into debt simply in order to live, we think it is right and moral to resist it.

Come get connected with SDBA’s projects!
  • Presenting debt and inequality related topics at forums, workshops and in radio productions.
  • Relieving Medical Debt through pennies-on-the-dollar buyback programs.
  • Promoting single-payer / Medicare for All to end the plague of medical debt
  • Money bail reform and fighting modern day debtors’ prisons and exploitative ticketing and fining schemes
  • Tiny Homes and other solutions for the homeless.
  • Student debt resistance. Check out the Debt Collective, our sister organization
  • Helping out America’s only non-profit check-cashing organization and fighting against usurious for-profit pay-day lenders and their ilk
  • Working on debarring US Banks that have been convicted of felonies from municipal contracts, and divesting from the Wall St. banks
  • Promoting the concept of Basic Income
  • Advocating for Postal banking
  • Organizing for public banking in Oakland! We made the first steps happen… now there’s a spinoff group
  • Bring your own debt-related project!

If you are new to Strike Debt and want to come early, meet one or two of us and get a briefing on our projects before we dive into our agenda, email us at strike.debt.bay.area@gmail.com

 Also check out our website, our twitter feed, our radio segments and our Facebook page. Take a look at the local Public Banking website, Friends of the Public Bank of Oakland.
Strike Debt Bay Area is an offshoot of Occupy Oakland and Strike Debt, itself an offshoot of Occupy Wall Street.

Strike Debt – Principles of Solidarity

Strike Debt is building a debt resistance movement. We believe that most individual debt is illegitimate and unjust. Most of us fall into debt because we are increasingly deprived of the means to acquire the basic necessities of life: health care, education, and housing. Because we are forced to go into debt simply in order to live, we think it is right and moral to resist it.

We also oppose debt because it is an instrument of exploitation and political domination. Debt is used to discipline us, deepen existing inequalities, and reinforce racial, gendered, and other social hierarchies. Every Strike Debt action is designed to weaken the institutions that seek to divide us and benefit from our division. As an alternative to this predatory system, Strike Debt advocates a just and sustainable economy, based on mutual aid, common goods, and public affluence.

Strike Debt is committed to the principles and tactics of political autonomy, direct democracy, direct action, creative openness, a culture of solidarity, and commitment to anti-oppressive language and conduct. We struggle for a world without racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, and all forms of oppression.

Strike Debt holds that we are all debtors, whether or not we have personal loan agreements. Through the manipulation of sovereign and municipal debt, the costs of speculator-driven crises are passed on to all of us. Though different kinds of debt can affect the same household, they are all interconnected, and so all household debtors have a common interest in resisting.

Strike Debt engages in public education about the debt-system to counteract the self-serving myth that finance is too complicated for laypersons to understand. In particular, it urges direct action as a way of stopping the damage caused by the creditor class and their enablers among elected government officials. Direct action empowers those who participate in challenging the debt-system.

Strike Debt holds that we owe the financial institutions nothing, whereas, to our friends, families and communities, we owe everything. In pursuing a long-term strategy for national organizing around this principle, we pledge international solidarity with the growing global movement against debt and austerity.

65037
Oct
14
Sun
Revolutionary University @ South Berkeley Senior Center
Oct 14 all-day

Join us for three days of presentations and discussions to help us understand our current conditions and the problems we face under capitalism. Most importantly, we will talk about the kind of organizing necessary in order to change these conditions and create the kind of society that we need.

Friday 10/12

6:30pm-9:00pm
Attica – a documentary film by Cinda Firestone

This film documents the events that began on September 9, 1971 when inmates at Attica State Prison seized the prison for four days after months of protesting inhumane conditions. The uprising resulted in the death of 43 people after state troopers were called in to put down the rebellion.

Saturday 10/13

10:30am-12:30pm
The Crisis of Civilization and How to Resolve It: An Introduction to Ecocentric Socialism

Kamran Nayeri is the publisher and editor of “Our Place in the World: A Journal of Ecosocialism”. Political Economist emeritus, UC Berkeley

1:30pm-3:00pm
The Middle East in the Era of Trump

Prof. As’ad AbuKhalil, Professor of Political Science at CSU Stanislaus and author of Saudi Arabia and the U.S.

3:30pm-5:00pm
The “Gig Economy”: A New Form of Servitude for the Working Class?

Keally McBride is a Professor of Politics at the University of San Francisco. She teaches and publishes on a wide variety of topics, including punishment, law, decolonization, revolutions and political economy.

6:30pm-8:00pm
France: In The Streets, Workplaces, Universities, Schools & Hospitals

Gilles Kobry, an activist in the French Trotskyist group, Fraction L’Etincelle, will discuss the recent struggles against the Macron government’s enforcement of the Labor Law in France, as well as attacks on access to public education and the challenges facing the workers in France and throughout Europe.

Sunday 10/14

2:00pm-3:30pm
Sports And Capitalism – How Sports are Used to Squeeze Public Money for Private Profit

Jules Boykoff, former professional soccer player, currently teaches political science at Pacific University in Oregon. Co-sponsored by the Anthropology and Social Change department at California Institute of Integral Studies, San Francisco

4:00pm-5:30pm
The Challenges We Face Today – Short-Term Mobilizing or Organizing for Real Social Change

A presentation by Speak Out Now (Revolutionary Workers Group) activists, followed by discussion and time to socialize. Refreshments and snacks provided.

65163
DSA East Bay General Meeting @ Omni Commons
Oct 14 @ 1:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Mark your calendars! Beginning in October, East Bay DSA will hold general membership meetings (GMs) on the second Sunday of every month at 1 p.m. This schedule begins Sunday, October 14. These meetings are the highest governing body of our organization and will include deliberation and voting on member-submitted resolutions, member announcements, reports from our committees, and more.

With our new, regular schedule, member-submitted resolutions will be accepted on a rolling basis. Please email them to resolutions-committee@eastbaydsa.org. The submissions deadline for each meeting is two days after the previous one.

General meetings are organized by the Meetings Committee. If you have questions or want to join our work, and in particular, if you have experience in A/V, child supervision, or graphic design, please write us at meetings-committee@eastbaydsa.org.

65075
Power To The People @ Oscar Grant Plaza
Oct 14 @ 1:00 pm – 5:00 pm

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Celebrate 52 years of the Black Panther Party with a concert & rally featuring X Clan and more! Hosted by Gina Madrid + Saturu Ned. FREE EVENT, call for unity and solutions!

65136
Occupy Oakland General Assembly (location moved)
Oct 14 @ 4:00 pm – 5:15 pm

NOTE: Because of the 52nd anniversary All Power To The People Black Panther Memorial & Concert at the plaza this week General Assembly will meet at the Omni Commons at 48th & Shattuck Avenue at the normal summer time of 4 PM.

 

The Occupy Oakland General Assembly meets every Sunday at 4 PM at Oscar Grant Plaza amphitheater at 14th Street & Broadway near the steps of City Hall. If for some reason the amphitheater is being used otherwise and/or OGP itself is inaccessible, we will meet at Kaiser Park, right next to the statues, on 19th St. between San Pablo and Telegraph. If it is raining (as in RAINING, not just misting) at 4:00 PM we meet in the basement of the Omni Collective, 4799 Shattuck Ave., Oakland. (Note: we tend to meet at 3:00 PM during the cooler months from November to early March after Daylights Savings Time.)

On every ‘last Sunday’ we meet a little earlier at 3 PM to have a community potluck to which all are welcome.

OO General Assembly has met on a continuous basis for over six years, since October 2011! Our General Assembly is a participatory gathering of Oakland community members and beyond, where everyone who shows up is treated equally. Our Assembly and the process we have collectively cultivated strives to reach agreement while building community.

At the GA committees, caucuses, and loosely associated groups whose representatives come voluntarily report on past and future actions, with discussion. We encourage everyone participating in the Occupy Oakland GA to be part of at least one associated group, but it is by no means a requirement. If you like, just come and hear all the organizing being done! Occupy Oakland encourages political activity that is decentralized and welcomes diverse voices and actions into the movement.

General Assembly Standard Agenda

Welcome & Introductions
Reports from Committees, Caucuses, & Independent Organizations
Announcements
(Optional) Discussion Topic

Occupy Oakland activities and contact info for some Bay Area Groups with past or present Occupy Oakland members.

Occupy Oakland Web Committee: (web@occupyoakland.org)
Strike Debt Bay Area : strikedebtbayarea.tumblr.com
Berkeley Post Office Defenders:http://berkeleypostofficedefenders.wordpress.com/
Alan Blueford Center 4 Justice:https://www.facebook.com/ABC4JUSTICE
Oakland Privacy Working Group:https://oaklandprivacy.wordpress.com
Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity: prisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com/
Bay Area AntiRepression: antirepression@occupyoakland.org
Biblioteca Popular: http://tinyurl.com/mdlzshy
Interfaith Tent: www.facebook.com/InterfaithTent
Port Truckers Solidarity: oaklandporttruckers.wordpress.com
Bay Area Intifada: bayareaintifada.wordpress.com
Transport Workers Solidarity: www.transportworkers.org
Fresh Juice Party (aka Chalkupy) freshjuiceparty.com/chalkupy-gallery
Sudo Room: https://sudoroom.org
Omni Collective: https://omnicommons.org/
First They Came for the Homeless: https://www.facebook.com/pages/First-they-came-for-the-homeless/253882908111999
Sunflower Alliance: http://www.sunflower-alliance.org/
Bay Area Public School: http://thepublicschool.org/bay-area

San Francisco based groups:
Occupy Bay Area United: www.obau.org
Occupy Forum: (see OBAU above)
San Francisco Projection Department: http://tinyurl.com/kpvb3rv

 

65168
Green Sunday: The Upcoming Nov. 6 Elections (and the Green Voter Guide) @ Niebyl Proctor Library
Oct 14 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Our October Green Sunday program will focus on the upcoming November 6 elections: the various measures and offices which will be on the ballot in Alameda County, and the written analyses and recommendations in our Voter Guide.

Join a discussion about state and local tax measures, as well as candidates for various local races: mayors, city councils, school boards, special districts, etc.

We will have short presentations by Laura Wells (Green candidate for Congress, CA-D13), Saied Karamooz (Green candidate for Oakland Mayor), James Vann (about housing issues on the ballot), and Mike Hutchinson (No on Measure AA, the Oakland Children Initiative of 2018).  [See bios below]

Bring your sample ballot, questions, and opinions.  This is an opportunity to ask about — and comment about — items on the November ballot.

SPONSOR: Green Sundays are a series of free programs & discussions sponsored by the Green Party of Alameda County. They are usually held on the 2nd Sunday of each month. The monthly business meeting of the County Council of the Green Party of Alameda County follows at 6:45 pm.  Council meetings are always open to anyone who is interested.

Hundreds of Green Voter Guides will be available, for those of you who can distribute them around town at cafes, bookstores, laundromats, libraries, and the like, or by passing them out at BART stations, farmers markets, grocery stores, or anywhere else where there’s a lot of foot traffic.

An electronic version of the Guide is now available at our blog website here: http://acgreens.wordpress.com/voter-guides

Bios of presenters:

Laura Wells has been a Green Party activist since 1992, when the Green Party was first on the ballot in California. She has been very active within the party at local and state levels, and has run as our candidate for state Controller and for Governor. This year, we called for a Green to run for Congress since Barbara Lee was running unopposed in the primary.  Laura stepped up as a write-in candidate, and won. She faced Barbara Lee at a League of Women Voters candidate forum on October 5.  With Top 2, they will be the only two candidates for Congress, District 13, on the ballot in November.   https://laurawells.org/

Saied Karamooz is running for Mayor of Oakland.  Saied has been involved in a number of progressive campaigns over the years.  Most notably, he has been serving as an active member of the Coalition for Police Accountability that spearheaded Measure LL, resulting in the establishment of a Police Commission in Oakland.  Currently he is a commissioner on Oakland’s Privacy Advisory Commission and President of the Jack London Improvement District.  Over the past few years, Saied has supported initiatives such as the Fight for 15, Stop Urban Shield, the Public Bank of Oakland, and No Coal in Oakland.  Saied’s campaign website (everyonesmayor.org) provides a clear outline of how to make Oakland an equitable city for all.

James Vann, a recently retired architect, is a long-time community, political, and housing activist in Oakland.  He co-founded the Oakland Tenants Union, and continues to fight for justice and equality in the policies and laws of Oakland’s Rent Adjustment Program toward the benefit of tenants.  As an original member of East Bay Housing Organizations (EBHO), James works for funding and construction of housing that is affordable to Oakland workers and households throughout the flatlands.  Politically, James was a organizer in 1967 of the Peace & Freedom Party, where he forged an alliance between Peace & Freedom and the Black Panther Party. P&F qualified for the ballot in 1968.  James was elected that same year to chair the opening session of the founding convention of the P&F Party. www.oaklandtenantsunion.org/

Mike Hutchinson was born and raised in Oakland and is a proud graduate of the Oakland Public Schools. After working in our schools for 20 years, in 2012 he became a public education advocate. Since then he has been working to save and fix public education in Oakland by any means necessary.  He is currently working to build the organization he co-founded, OPEN: the Oakland Public Education Network, which is a founding member of the Journey For Justice national alliance, and the west coast anchor organization for the #WeChoose national campaign.

65152
Indivisible Berkeley General Assembly @ Finnish Hall
Oct 14 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

65171
Oct
15
Mon
Monsanto Shutdown
Oct 15 all-day

We will be holding a large engaging event at the toxic chemical giant turned food tyrant, now known as Monsanto-Bayer. We will arrive at their Woodland, CA facility to shut it down!! This is the largest biotech seed breeding facility in the world!

Prepare for a festive, fun, yet serious event.
Costumes (Bee, Tomatoes, Corn, etc.) , large puppets, Haz Mat suits, gas masks, protest signs, etc., are encouraged!

We will need everyone’s help to shut them down!

If you eat food, drink water, value yours and your children’s lives, you will want to be there!
Please spread the word far and wide!!!

Organizer:
The Anti-Monsanto Project
Time of Event:
4:45 AM – 3 PM PDT
65125
Capitalism: Six Part Documentary Series @ Oakland Peace Center
Oct 15 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

Movie Trailer: https://youtu.be/lXyMwgGT6yg

6:30 PM – Introduction
6:40 PM – Film Screening
7:40 PM – Discussion
8:30 PM – Closing

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Please bring snacks and other things to share if you can!!!

The economic system of capitalism has undermined democracies throughout the world, created huge income disparities, wrecked our ecosystem and isolated us from our own communities. Yet very few people truly understand its roots.

This six-part documentary series from Icarus Films is an ambitious but accessible series that looks at both the history of ideas and the social forces that have shaped the capitalist world. Featuring interviews with some of the world’s great historians, economist, anthropologists and social critics (including Noam Chomsky, Thomas Piketty and more), CAPITALISM questions the myth of the unfettered free market, explores the nature of debt and commodities, and retraces some of the great economic debates of the last 200 years.

If we are going to challenge our current system, we first need to understand it. Join us, each Monday for a FREE screening and informal discussion. Please bring food to share for a collective potluck meal!!

All screenings will be inside Shelton Hall at the Oakland Peace Center, 111 Fairmount Ave.

Monday, 9/17 – Episode One: Adam Smith, The Birth of the Free Market – Capitalism is much more complex than the vision Adam Smith laid out in The Wealth of Nations. Indeed, it predates Smith by centuries, and is rooted in the predatory practices of colonialism and the slave trade.

Monday, 9/24 – Episode Two: The Wealth of Nations: A New Gospel? – Adam Smith was both economist and moral philosopher. But his work on morality is largely forgotten, leading to tragic distortions that have shaped our global economic system.

Monday, 10/1 – Episode Three: Ricardo and Malthus: Did You Say Freedom? – The roots of today’s global trade agreements lie in the work of stockbroker David Ricardo and demographer Thomas Malthus. Together, they would restructure society in the image of the market.

Monday, 10/8 – Episode Four: What If Marx Was Right? – Have we gotten Marx wrong by focusing on the Communist Manifesto instead of his critique of how capitalism works – a critique that is as relevant and penetrating as ever?

Monday, 10/15 – Episode Five: Keynes vs. Hayek: A Fake Debate? – The ideological divide between the philosophies of John Maynard Keynes and Friedrich Hayek has dominated economics for nearly a century. Is it time for the pendulum to swing back to Keynes? Or do we need a whole new approach that goes beyond this simple dualism?

Monday, 10/22 – Episode Six: Karl Polanyi, The Human Factor – An exploration of the life and work of Karl Polanyi, who sought to reintegrate society and economy. Could the commodification of labour and money ultimately be as disastrous as floods, drought and earthquakes?

65160